Did you Know?

In the United States during Prohibition, Laphroaig whisky could be legally purchased, but only if prescribed by a doctor.

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Cider apples grow only in the Western regions of England, where the soil and climate conditions are suitable. Herefordshire is the main cider apple growing county, with around 10,000 acres of orchards.

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Cider harvest begins in mid-September and, depending on the size of the crop, is usually completed by early December.

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The key elements of the cider apple are the right balance of sugars, acids and tannins which in turn create the special flavours of a traditional English cider. The cider maker refers to them as either, bittersweets, bittersharps or sharps.

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You cannot eat a cider apple, or cook with it. It's sole purpose is to make cider.

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Farm workers’ wages in earlier times included four pints of cider a day.

courtesy of NACM

Did you know?

The volume of cider produced annually in the UK is in excess of 6 million hectolitres or 130 million UK gallons.

courtesy of NACM

Did you know?

45% of all the apples grown in the UK are now used here for cider making. A reducing amount of apple juice concentrate from central European countries like Austria, Germany and Italy is required to make up the shortfall and to blend to produce certain styles of cider.

courtesy of NACM

Did you know?

Several commercial cider makers now make single varietal ciders using individual cider apple and other varieties. These include Kingston Black, Tremlett’s Bitter, Dabinett, Cox and Katy.

courtesy of NACM

Did you know?

The first listing of cider presses as a source of income appears in 1230 in a Royal Charter granted to Jocelin Bishop of Bath.

courtesy of NACM